How to support the Occupy Wall Street movement from the comfort and safety of your own home.


A lot of people would join the Occupy Wall Street protest, but they’re tied to their hometown because they have too many bills to pay and too much to lose even if they could afford to travel to New York or any other major city with an occupying protest. Some people are compromising by making online donations and hyping the movement in conversation. Some people are ordering the protesters pizza delivery. But part of the whole point of the protest is that so many people in America (and around the world) can’t afford to order themselves pizza much less pay for a stranger’s dinner.

The people who need the most help are the least able to help those who are trying to help them. And the poor understand the pain of living under a broken system more intimately than a lot of the protesters who have time to protest over the school holidays. A lot of these people are already willing to join any of the Occupy protests if they could. A lot more of them would be willing if they could do it in a way that doesn’t take them away from work, doesn’t cost anything and won’t get them in trouble with the law.

The simple solution is to take the Occupy Wall Street protest to it’s inevitable conclusion. It’s already spread to major cities around the world. The logical next step is for it to spread to every street.

If you want to show your support for the Occupy Wall Street movement then set up a tent in your front yard. You don’t even have to sleep in it. Just put it out there like an American flag or a football pendant and show the world your support.

Imagine seeing news footage from a helicopter flying over miles and miles of suburbs with tents on every lawn. That would be impossible to ignore.

Point in fact, you should be doing that anyway. The American system cuts neighbors off from one another and pits them against each other. The suburbs aren’t a friendly place. They’re a stressed out, anxious place full of lonely people with cabin fever. We should all be out on our front porches BBQing, getting to know one another and forming a community anyway.

Chances are someone in every suburb is going to be throwing a party this weekend anyway. Why not have a lawn occupation party? Let your party be your protest. Just do it nonviolently on your own property and you will have nothing to lose. The cops might hassle one or two people, but if the entire city is partying on their lawn peacefully and nonviolently then what could they possible do? Declare a state of emergency for having a good time? And if it’s really come to that then let’s push that button. Let’s find out if our society has really devolved into such a dystopian nightmare that the police would actually go through town ripping down tents from old men’s lawns. If that’s how it’s going to be then that just goes to show there’s really something to talk about here and the protesters aren’t just naive or spoiled.

Occupy America. Occupy all the streets. Occupy your lawn.  Let your party be your protest, and vote with your tent.

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4 comments

  1. I looked for my old tent at my parents house today and couldn’t find it. I’m headed to buy a new one tomorrow and the stuff to make a sign that says Occupy America… I am concerned that the people in my neighborhood will destroy my tent or my signs… but I’ve decided that’s fine… I’ll just put it up again, or make new one’s… Moving this demonstration to our front lawns is the next logical step. We can file for permits to peacefully legally protest in our cities in the parks during the daytime and ALSO show our support from home after “curfew”… =)

  2. I don’t have a front lawn. Live on the Xth floor in a tall building with a mini-balcony just large enough for the garbage can. What do I do? The “comfort of my home”? 160 sq ft at 35 in a shared flat, rent eats up most of my little pay and I can’t get anything else. Apparently I’m overqualified, but I WOULD go cleaning or work at the local supermarket if they’d only take me…

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